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Recent News

*This writeup is the first in a series of articles we'd like to share about the different challenges we all face in school. In this issue, Maya Velani tells her story about living with ulcerative colitis.*

Hi my name is Maya, I'm in year 12 and I'm going to tell you about the difficulties I've faced going through high school with a chronic illness and how I've overcome them.

I have a condition called ulcerative colitis where my large intestine can get inflamed leading to frequent visits to the toilet and terrible cramps.
When I was diagnosed I found it hard to cope in lessons and missed a lot of work. This didn't help me as it stressed me out which made my condition worse.

On top of this I was put on steroids for a whole year which made me gain a lot of weight, this wasn't great for my self esteem as I was worried people were constantly judging me. I was nervous to use my toilet pass for the same reason. I quickly realised it didn't matter what others thought my health mattered most and people probably weren't judging me as much as I thought.

I was still however having bad days and getting stressed about being behind in work. This is when I learnt that I had to tell teachers when I wasn't feeling well so I would stop putting too much pressure on myself to be 'perfect'.

It was hard in the beginning and still can be sometimes but I've learnt to not worry about others opinions, to stop putting pressure on myself and to tell teachers when I'm having bad days. The last one is particularly important because sometimes telling others helps you feel better even if sometimes it's just a friend it will always help a little.

Categories: Case Study, Blog, posted on 30 Jul 2021

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Before the Easter break, sixth form students embarked on a journey guiding year 11 through their formal assessments and assisting them with their A-level options.

The mentoring scheme is the brainchild of year 12 and Senior Students' leader on careers, Ahbab Ali.

Mentor, Zakariya Chowdhury, said "I have gained a great sense of satisfaction in seeking to ease this burden meanwhile enhancing my connection to the school."

"Overall, I think by having someone who can empathise with your struggles and can help you overcome them, it can form a healthy relationship especially during any assessment season predicaments you may find yourself in."

Meanwhile, another mentor, Jami Chowdhury, expressed "The peer mentor scheme is an amazing prospect for year 11 students to receive tips and advice from experienced students. I can say that this scheme benefits these students during the current exam period and especially in a pandemic."

Year 11 students are not the only party to be learning from new experiences, as the mentors are learning lots about their own futures.

Malak Grira says it has allowed her to "get some clarity on what I intend to do in the future and it further motivated it me to work hard."

"Working with my mentor has really allowed us to connect and form a really strong bond over what we both enjoy in terms of academics and future aspirations."

Categories: Ideas into Action, posted on 5 May 2021

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From the 6th of May 2021, 16 to 17-year-olds and foreign nationals living in Wales will have the right to vote in Senedd Elections for the first time. The ability for young people to exercise their democratic right is a testament to Article 12 of the UNCRC United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which states that every child and young person, including you, have the right to be listened to and taken seriously. This means that 16 to 17-year-olds can make their voices heard on an extensive array of issues that matter to them and their future. Consequently, young people will be equipped with a more effective capacity to choose their right leader who will shape the world they live in.

In addition to this, children and young people aged 14-15 can now register to vote. Although the primary focus of registering to vote is to enable you to influence the outcome of elections, it can also benefit you in the future where you will grow up as healthy and confident individuals.

When registering to vote, please consider whether you wish for a postal vote or to vote in person, as some of you may be shielding. If you haven’t already registered to vote (it is super quick and easy to fill out), please do so ASAP as time is running out: https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote.

Wales is only part of a handful of countries that allow 16 to 17-year-olds to vote, implying that a shocking number of young people from other countries are still being denied the right to vote. Therefore, utilise your right to vote make your voice heard this May, so that you can define and establish new horizons for the forthcoming Wales.

Categories: Blog, posted on 13 Apr 2021

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